Alongside all the harsh words of the US presidential campaign, Donald Trump made clear his thoughts on climate change, labelling it a “hoax” made up by the Chinese “in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive” But climate change is not a hoax, and as delegates at UN Climate Change Conference (COP22) mentioned rising concern about what Mr Trump’s time in office will mean for the future of our planet.The president-elect is no stranger to the built environment, having made his fortune by developing vast areas of Manhattan, before expanding his real estate empire across the globe. Indeed, during his rallies, he has labelled himself ‘the greatest builder’. But despite his self-confidence, there is little or no evidence of his environmental credentials and he has actively called for large-scale deregulation of the sector. Across the world we are seeing signs of change and shifts from industry towards more ethical energy practices. As Mr Trump knows, money talks, and in the end, it will hopefully be the investors that decide the success or failure green energy in buildings with business and cities driving better energy practices, perhaps despite Mr Trump’s influence, we can continue to build momentum globally to address climate change. Mr Trump’s scepticism of climate change clearly signals potential to damage progress towards a more sustainable planet. But there is still hope, because the global threat posed by climate change is much bigger than one man and one job.

Alongside all the harsh words of the US presidential campaign, Donald Trump made clear his thoughts on climate change, labelling it a “hoax” made up by the Chinese “in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive” But climate change is not a hoax, and as delegates at UN Climate Change Conference (COP22) mentioned rising concern about what Mr Trump’s time in office will mean for the future of our planet.The  president-elect is no stranger to the built environment, having made his fortune by developing vast areas of Manhattan, before expanding his real estate empire across the globe. Indeed, during his rallies, he has labelled himself ‘the greatest builder’. But despite his self-confidence, there is little or no evidence of his environmental credentials and he has actively called for large-scale deregulation of the sector. Across the world we are seeing signs of change and shifts from industry towards more ethical energy practices. As Mr Trump knows, money talks, and in the end, it will hopefully be the investors that decide the success or failure green energy in buildings  With business and cities driving better energy practices, perhaps despite Mr Trump’s influence, we can continue to build momentum globally to address climate change. Mr Trump’s scepticism of climate change clearly signals potential to damage progress towards a more sustainable planet. But there is still hope, because the global threat posed by climate change is much bigger than one man and one job.